Chicago speed dating reviews

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You can also do nothing but nurse a beer at some North Side watering holes and wait for the red-cooler-toting Tamale Guy to spring through the door, like Santa for the seriously sauced.

But The Delta manages to set itself apart by serving Mississippi Delta tamales, a distinct style that, if it weren't completely obvious by now, originated in the Mississippi Delta (basically, the northwest part of that state).

The cornbread arrives in a cast-iron pan, is firm enough to slice neatly and eat in-hand, yet sports a texture so delightfully loose and crumbly that you may worry — needlessly — that it will fall apart.

Barrio offers a selection of tacos both traditional and “deconstructed” (that means you get to build them yourself). Sadly, you have to have the same filling in all three.

Barrio was bustling on a recent Friday afternoon, and I guessed there were two reasons: Maybe the crowd was pumped with that end-of-the-week-holiday-season vibe or maybe it was buoyed by a sense of expectation (or already knew what was coming).

We present them..." data-sc-sl="ct-food-restaurant-reviews-speedround-1220" data-sc-cont="story" data-sc-nn="Chicago Tribune" data-sc-contid="95448490" When the end of the year rolls around, Food & Dining likes to take a quick look at new restaurants that, for one reason or another (the principal reason being X restaurants to cover and Y amount of time, where X Y), we didn’t get around to covering. We present them in speed-dating format: We’re not giving you each restaurant’s whole story, but there should be enough information here to discern whether you’re tempted to visit.

Perhaps the restaurant’s greatest achievement is the space it has created.

What could have been a large, cavernous room, has been pared down into something cozy by a riot of patterns, seemingly invited in from all corners of the globe: zigzagging tile, elaborate carved wood, sparkling chandeliers, lush plants, flickering candles, Oriental rugs — all presided over by an open kitchen, glowing like a warm beacon from the back of the room.

The regular red hot tamales () come three to an order and are astoundingly tender, all without a trace of grittiness.As we walked out, back into the stark, cold street, something Jack Kerouac wrote in “The Dharma Bums” came to mind: “I think it’s all lovely hallucination but I love it sorta.”Chicago abounds with tamales.You can grab them at grocery stores, order them at an untold number of Mexican restaurants and pick them up by the dozen from vendors on select street corners.Kinzie St., 312-940-9900, barriochicago.com— Bill Daley Beet hummus at Beatnik kicks off the meal with sparks of citrus zest and dusky notes of clove, offset by the crunch of fried chickpeas and the salty tang of blue cheese.(Annie Grossinger / Chicago Tribune)Beatnik is a study in texture.

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